Pre-diabetes symptoms

By | November 5, 2017

Pre-diabetes symptomsType 2 diabetes mellitus is becoming more and more important in society. It is known that poor control of blood sugar, lipids and high blood pressure are factors that seriously damage vessels throughout the body, causing lasting damage to a number of organs and degrading the quality of life.

One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic pre-diabetes symptoms that suggest you’ve moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst

This type of diabetes mellitus differs significantly from type 1. The latter is of autoimmune genesis, mainly in childhood, with acute onset and requires active treatment to prevent acute complications, and chronic ones are observed after a certain period of disease. Diabetes mellitus type 2 starts slowly, submally, in older age, and unlike the previous one, diagnosing it often happens accidentally, on other occasions. Here, due to the large but unnoticeable limitation of adverse glycemic control, the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension and smoking, chronic complications occur soon after the disease is detected, if not at the very detection.

Pre-diabetes is a condition of high blood sugar, either fasting or after eating, above the normal but below the diagnostic values ​​for diabetes. It is a global problem correlating with the incidence of obesity, which has been significantly increased in recent decades.

Generally, glycemic control disorders are discovered by chance in a prophylactic study or in connection with another disease. Complaints are missing.

These are our known risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes symptoms:
– Overweight or obese – Body Mass Index> 25 – 30. Abdominal obesity with a waist circumference of over 80 cm in women and 94 cm in men is particularly risky.
– Motor activity improves glucose uptake and improves insulin action.
– Age> 45 years As the age progresses, the metabolism changes, the muscle to fat ratio changes, the kilograms increase, the motor activity decreases.
– Family burden with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
– Ethnicity – African-Americans, Latino-Americans, Aborigines, Asians.
– Data on gestational diabetes or a history of birth of a fruit weighing more than 4 kg.
– Data on polycystic ovary syndrome.

Very often, the pre-diabetic condition correlates with changes in lipid status, especially with HDL-cholesterol lowering and triglyceride elevations as well as arterial hypertension. These features, along with weight changes, shape the picture of the metabolic syndrome.

Pre-diabetes symptoms are hardly to be determined. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles.

Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you’ve moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include:
– Increased thirst
– Frequent urination
– Fatigue
– Blurred vision